Author Archives: Richard Cytowic

The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and the Power of Seeing

What might this be?” Such an innocuous question—such profound results. No psychological concept has penetrated culture as much as “the Inkblot test” has. Continue reading

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The Pit In Your Stomach is Actually Your Second Brain

Gut feelings influence your mood and well-being. Continue reading

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Behind Her Eyes: A Novel

An engaging suspense thriller despite its major gaffe in the ending’s twist. Novel in its concept and construction, this is one unsettling book. Continue reading

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Kill the Next One

“Move over Hitchcock, P. D. James, Ruth Rendell, and more. Here is a thriller to make others fade. Well-drawn characters, a devilish plot, and first-rate storytelling make this an emotional mystery that resonates and disturbs.” Continue reading

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Big Mistake: Small Kids Left to Their Own Devices

Relaxing rules for kids and screen tech is probably a mistake. Continue reading

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At Danceteria and Other Stories

“Walker’s stories intersect the tipping point when big city gay life went from carefree hedonism and glitzy self–indulgence to the moment when self–satisfied habitués of the demi–monde began to witness the wide scale decimation of their generation.” Continue reading

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Can a TV Series Teach Us to Love Androids?

All of us have all seen and possibly felt the obsessive pull of another, the draw of a potential beloved. But does love’s requirement of “another” mean that the other must be a human being? Continue reading

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The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter

“What makes a tool superior to another . . . has nothing to do with how new it is. What matters is how it enlarges or diminishes us.” Continue reading

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Thomas Murphy: A Novel

“Everyone is disabled. Love exists for our disabilities. And forgotten things, though they remain forgotten, have a life of their own.” Continue reading

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Body Language Says it All: Hillary Hides, Donald Emotes

During the surreal experience that was the first presidential debate each contender’s body language sent one consistent message: Hillary hides and Donald runs on emotion. Continue reading

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Utopia Is Creepy: And Other Provocations

Richard Cytowic review of Nicholas Carr’s “Utopia Is Creepy: And Other Provocations” Continue reading

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$50m Judgment Says Brain Training a Sham

Your mother had it right: The most reliable way to improve your thinking is to eat a varied diet, get enough sleep, exercise moderately, and focus on whatever you are doing instead of flitting from one thing to another. Continue reading

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A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age

“Just because there’s a number doesn’t mean that the number was arrived at properly,” says Daniel Levitin, the prolific musician, neuroscientist, and educator at McGill University. Continue reading

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Muscle Memory—It’s In Your Head, Not Your Limbs

Attention matters more than people assume, and what matters most is how you focus and deploy it. Continue reading

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Good Morning, Midnight: A Novel

A debut novel with an intriguing premise. . . . What is left when everything is gone? What does it mean to be alive in the universe and the grandeur of vast emptiness? Continue reading

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